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Orthopaedics

Guthrie Orthopaedics

Interviews with Dr. LaVancher

  • From Roberts Eyecare

    What is Astigmatism? How is Astigmatism corrected?

    Astigmatism is a refractive error usually associated with an irregularly shaped cornea. A spherical cornea creates a single focal point while an astigmatic, irregularly shaped cornea creates more than one point of focus. As a result the image that is formed on the retina of the eye is blurred. Glasses, contact lenses and refractive surgery may all be used to correct Astigmatism.

  • From Roberts Eyecare

    Why should I be concerned about glaucoma if my vision is fine?

    The most common types of glaucoma involve a slowly progressing destruction of the Optic Nerve of the eye. In general, it initially affects peripheral vision in a way that isn’t noticeable without specialized testing. A person with glaucoma will usually be in the advanced stages before noticing any problems with vision. With special testing glaucoma is usually easy to detect in the early stages and it is treatable with eye drops. In some cases surgery may be required if eye drops do not adequately control the glaucoma.

  • From Guthrie Specialty Eye Care

    What is a cataract?

    A cataract is a clouding or opaque area of the lens of the eye - an area that is normally transparent. As this thickening occurs, it prevents light rays from passing through the lens and focusing on the retina - the light sensitive tissue lining located in the back of the eye. This clouding is caused when some of the protein which makes up the lens begins to clump together and interferes with vision.

  • From Roberts Eyecare

    Can contact lenses be worn for sports?

    Yes, contact lenses provide excellent vision for most sports. However, keep in mind that contacts do not provide protection from injury. Contact lens wearers should consider using sports safety goggles for maximum protection during sports activities.

  • From Family Audiology PLLC

    What are the different types of hearing loss?

    Conductive hearing loss occurs from loss of sound sensitivity resulting from abnormalities of the middle and/or outer ear. This type of loss is common in children with ear infections; once the infection has cleared up, the hearing is usually restored. Sensorineural hearing loss results from abnormalities in the inner ear and/or nerve paths to the brain. The auditory cells and nerve are permanently damaged. This is the type of hearing loss often referred to as “nerve deafness.” Mixed hearing losses are those that have symptoms of both conductive and sensorineural hearing losses.