• From Lourdes Regional Cancer Center

    What is digital mammography?

    Digital mammography is a system where x-ray film pictures of the breast are replaced by solid-state detectors that convert x-rays into electric signals. These detectors are similar to those found in digital cameras. The electrical signals are used to produce images (similar to a digital photograph) of the breast that can be viewed on a computer screen or printed on special films. The dramatic difference in the quality of that picture allows Lourdes radiologists a better opportunity to discover abnormalities.

  • From Guthrie Cardiovascular Center

    What types of echocardiograms are available? What is the difference?

    There are three other types of echocardiograms performed: 1. Stress Echocardiogram: combines the echo exam with treadmill exercise or medications that simulate exercise. This test is used to diagnose the presence and severity of coronary artery blockages. 2. Echocardiogram/Dopler Evaluation (with or without contrast): combines the echo exam with intravenous administration of a sterile contrast solution. This solution may be needed to better visualize your heart. 3. Transesophageal Echocardiogram: utilizes a special miniaturized echo transducer that is passed down the esophagus to better image the heart. This test is most often used to evaluate patients with prior neurologic events (strokes or transient ischemic attacks), heart valve replacements, infections of the heart, or abnormal rhythms.

  • From Broome Obstetrics & Gynecology, P.C.

    Does your office offer testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers?

    Yes, our office is a leader in BRCA screening for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer as well as offering screenings for other cancers such as endometrial and colorectal cancers. If your test is positive for hereditary cancer most surgical procedures can be done using minimally invasive surgery.

  • From Guthrie Specialty Eye Care

    What is involved in cataract surgery?

    Cataract surgery is one of the most common operations performed and one of the safest and most effective. Surgery involves removing the cloudy lens and replacing it with a substitute lens. If cataracts are present in both eyes, they cannot be removed at the same time. Your physician will need to perform surgery on each eye separately.

    Cataracts are generally removed in one of two ways:

      Phacoemulsification (Also called small incision cataract surgery.)

      This, most common, type of cataract removal procedure involves the surgeon making a small incision on the side of the cornea - the clear, dome-shaped surface that covers the front of the eye - where a tiny probe emits ultrasound waves to soften and break up the cloudy center of the lens. The cataract is then removed by suction through the same incision.
      Extracapsular Surgery

      During this procedure, a longer incision is made on the side of the cornea to remove the hard center of the lens; the remainder of the lens is then removed by suction.

  • From UHS

    What services are offered at UHS?

    UHS provides a wealth of comprehensive health and wellness services. Our specialties include Primary Care, Cancer Care, Neurosciences, Orthopedics, Heart Care and Women’s Health. For a complete list of services visit us online at www.uhs.net or call our Nurse Direct line at 607-763-5555.