Celebrating tiny machines making a big difference

By Matt Porter

Cynthia Giroux, a Corning researcher. said the company's been working with nano particles for decades even before "nano" was a word.

April 3, 2013 Updated Apr 3, 2013 at 8:22 PM EDT

Binghamton, NY (WBNG Binghamton) Binghamton University is joining a nationwide celebration of the tiny machines making a big difference in today's world.

The study of nano science and engineering was the subject of a "Science Cafe" at the Lost Dog.

The program is part of a nationwide festival of education programs involving nanoscale science and engineering.

Guests at the program heard from researchers at Corning Incorporated.

Cynthia Giroux, a Corning researcher. said the company's been working with nano particles for decades even before "nano" was a word.

"From the beginning of colored glasses, the red lights on the railroad lines those were done by having nano particles of gold dispersed throughout the glass," Giroux said. "We didn't know that at the time."

Glass fiber optic cables transmitting the world's information online from email to movies depend on nano technology.

This weekend, you can check out nano demonstrations at the Roberson Museum Saturday and Oakdale Mall Sunday.

A "Science Theater and Demonstration" will be held from noon to four in the afternoon on April 6 at the Roberson Museum.

A demonstration on nanobots will be held from noon to four in the afternoon on April 7 at the Oakdale Mall. The event will include hand-on activities including how to create nano materials with the use of everyday supplies.

To submit a comment on this article, your email address is required. We respect your privacy and your email will not be visible to others nor will it be added to any email lists.