Little Leaguers let down by MLB doping scandal

By Kelly McCarthy

August 5, 2013 Updated Aug 6, 2013 at 9:30 AM EST

Oneonta, NY (WBNG Binghamton) Some of the most passionate baseball players spoke out on the use performance-enhancement drugs. They're not pros, but members of youth teams visiting the Cooperstown All Star Village.

It's not always clear what 12-year-old boys will say if you ask them a question, but their thoughts on recent suspensions of Major League Baseball players can be heard loud and clear.

"These players need to be stopped," said Peter Fusck of Chicago, IL, "Because they're ruining the game for everyone else."

Thousands of young players come to the Cooperstown All Star Village to better their skills and compete in a week-long tournament. Families and coaches are making sure players know the risks to using steroids.

"It comes up," said coach Len Lehman of New Hope, Pa, "And we basically just in a casual conversation we basically talk about it. And we're straight forward with them, we use the words steroids and the advanced drugs they're cheating on with and we tell them how it is."

Many young athletes can't figure out why some professional players chose to use performance-enhancement substances.

"That's what we all want to know," said Charlie Montgomery of Chicago, IL, "Why would they do it if they're already really good."

Some players featured in the National Baseball Hall of Fame museum in Cooperstown have been caught using performing-enhancement drugs. Although the Hall of Fame won't recognize the players as inductees, they can't deny that steroid use is now a part of baseball history.

"From the museum standpoint," said Director of Communications Brad Horn, "Because feats have been achieved in recent years and because history happens regardless of performance-enhancing substance use or not, we do have artifacts from many players who have been suspected, we have artifacts from players who were named today, who are going to remain on display in the museum."

Horn said they will not induct a player into the hall of fame museum if they've been linked to steroid use. He mentions this past year there were no living inductees into the hall of fame because they refuse to lower their standards of a worthy athlete.

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