Photos of victims shown in Powell murder trial

By Haley Burton
By Kelly McCarthy

July 15, 2014 Updated Jul 16, 2014 at 6:38 AM EST

Binghamton, NY (WBNG Binghamton) The jury in Aaron Powell's double murder trial was shown photos from the Town of Binghamton home where the two victims were killed and photos from the autopsies of Christina Powell and Mario Masciarelli.

Powell, 40, of Binghamton was not in the courtroom Tuesday. He has not appeared at his trial since it began with jury selection on July 10, 2014.

He is charged with one count of first degree murder and two counts of second degree murder for the deaths of Christina Powell, 35 and Mario Masciarelli, 24.

On Tuesday morning, prosecutors called Sergeant Matthew Zandy with the Binghamton Police Department to the stand.

Zandy was one of the investigators who collected evidence at the crime scene in March 2013 at Christina Powell's home on Lisi Lane in the Town of Binghamton.

Jurors were shown more than 100 photos, including some of Christina Powell and Mario Masciarelli.

Family and friends of both victims in the courtroom fought back tears as the pictures were shown.

Broome County District Attorney Gerald Mollen argues Powell followed Christina and Mario home from a date at the Airport Inn.

Mollen says he entered the home and killed Masciarelli by beating him with a baseball bat and used an electrical cord to strangle and kill Christina.

Onondaga County Medical examiner Laura Knight performed the autopsies and confirmed those causes of death in her testimony.

Masciarelli suffered two skull fractures that led to his death and Christina Powell also had blunt force injuries to her head that contributed to her death by strangulation.

During cross examination Powell's attorney Tom Cline questioned the medical examiner about finding out the exact time of deaths.

Knight told jurors she could not determine who died first. She also said there was no alcohol found in either of their bodies.

Witness testimony will continue on Thursday in Broome County Court.

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