FDA launches first national public education campaign to reduce youth tobacco use

FDA launches first national public education campaign to reduce youth tobacco use

February 4, 2014 Updated Feb 4, 2014 at 5:45 PM EST

(FDA news release) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday announced the launch of a national public education campaign to prevent youth tobacco use and reduce the number of kids ages 12 to 17 who become regular smokers.

According to a FDA news release:

“The Real Cost” campaign is the FDA’s first of several planned tobacco education campaigns using the new authority granted under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, signed into law by President Obama in 2009.

Tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of disease, disability and death in the United States, causing more than 480,000 deaths each year. Each day, more than 3,200 youth under age 18 in the United States try their first cigarette and more than 700 kids under age 18 become daily smokers.

As part of Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius’ call to make the next generation tobacco free, “The Real Cost” campaign targets the 10 million young people ages 12-17 who have never smoked a cigarette but are open to it and youth who are already experimenting with cigarettes and are at risk of becoming regular smokers.

“We know that early intervention is critical, with almost nine out of every ten regular adult smokers picking up their first cigarette by age 18,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. “Today marks a historic moment as we launch the FDA’s first-ever national education campaign to prevent tobacco use among our nation’s youth, and we bring to life the real costs that are of the most concern to young people.”

“The Real Cost” campaign uses a comprehensive multimedia approach, compelling facts and vivid imagery designed to change beliefs and behaviors over time. The ads were developed to educate youth about the dangers of tobacco use and to encourage them to be tobacco-free. The campaign uses several social media platforms to create space for teens to engage in peer-to-peer conversations about the issue in ways that are authentic to who they are.

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