Assemblywoman Lupardo urges Governor to declare March 11-17 MS Awareness Week in New York

By WBNG News

Assemblywoman Lupardo urges Governor to declare March 11-17 MS Awareness Week in New York

March 11, 2013 Updated Mar 11, 2013 at 1:00 PM EST

(WBNG Binghamton) New York State Assemblywoman Donna Lupardo (D-Endwell) will be at the State Capitol this week, urging Governor Andrew Cuomo to adopt an Assembly resolution proclaiming March 11-17 “MS Awareness Week in New York”.

And Advocacy Manager, Aaron Ward, with the National MS Society Upstate New York Chapter, will be on the Assembly floor to accept a bound copy of the legislative resolution.

According to a news release:

Assemblywoman Lupardo is a part of the New York State MS Legislative Alliance – a group of five state lawmakers who raise awareness and promote education about MS, speak to groups or attend events affiliated with the National MS Society, and share updates and events with constituents via social media, mail and website correspondence.  Current members include Senator Mark Grisanti and Assembly members Mark Johns, Donna Lupardo, Crystal Peoples-Stokes, and Steven McLaughlin.

Individuals in Upstate New York are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis at a rate of twice the national average. Across the state, the Upstate New York Chapter serves more than 12,800 people living with MS and their friends, family and caregivers. In the Greater Binghamton area, there are more than 1,168 people living with MS. The disease impacts and challenges the lives of more than 2.1 million people worldwide.

During MS Awareness Week, the National MS Society is offering programs to the public to help them learn more about MS and to identify sources of support for those who are currently in the process of being diagnosed or are currently living with MS. MS Awareness Week’s main focus is to spread awareness of MS and encourage people to Join the Movement® against MS.

The average health care cost per year for people living with MS is an estimated $70,000; these costs can exceed $2 million over the lifetime of a person with MS.

Most Americans are diagnosed with MS between the ages of 20 and 50, making it the number one disabler of young adults. There are an estimated 10,400 new cases diagnosed each year.
 

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