The 'long gray line' mourns fallen Trooper Christopher Skinner

By Kelly McCarthy

June 3, 2014 Updated Jun 3, 2014 at 7:04 PM EDT

Town of Union, NY (WBNG Binghamton) Among the crowds of people at Trooper Skinner's funeral were more than a thousand law enforcement officers from across the country and even Canada.

Row after row of law enforcement stood tall in formation to honor Trooper Skinner. Their uniforms might not all look the same, but they all carry the shield to protect and serve.

"Agencies from New York state, agencies from as far as Alaska, Florida," said New York State Police Superintendent Joseph D'Amico, "Are here to pay final respects to Trooper Christopher Skinner."

"State lines don't really mean much when it comes down to the bottom line here," said Alaska State Trooper James Eyester, "Which is the ultimate sacrifice."

Trooper Skinner was a 13-year veteran with state police. News of his death traveled across the country and brought more than a thousand of his brothers and sisters to his funeral.

"We definitely can stand out here for a few hours and suck it up," said Sgt. Richard Villanuava, Texas Highway Patrol, "And definitely send him out the right way like he should be sent off."

Troopers dedicate part of their uniform to remember their own.

"There's a black stripe that you'll see down the side of all of our pants," said Capt. Neely Jennings, New York State Police,
"And that's to honor our fallen troopers."

They honor fallen troopers with every step while walking the 'Long Gray Line' to pay their respects.

"Right now it's probably about 4,000 miles long," Eyester said.

"It's what we're called to do, it takes a calling definitely to do this," Villanuava said. "We go above and beyond and sometimes unfortunately this is the outcome."

Trooper Christopher Skinner was the fifth line of duty death for state police in the last 10 months prompting more than a thousand law enforcement from across the nation to be here for his final farewell.