Kacyvenski develops product to measure head trauma

By wbng sports

Kacyvenski develops product to measure head trauma

July 2, 2013 Updated Jan 8, 2014 at 11:22 AM EST

(WBNG Binghamton) One of the biggest concerns for athletes of all ages is diagnosing concussions. Now, a former NFL player and Endicott native is doing something to help that problem.

Isaiah Kacyvenski's company MC10, has teamed up with Reebok with a breakthrough product that helps coaches, athletes, trainers and referees determine if a player has suffered an intense hit to the head.

Isaiah Kacyvenski knows something about getting concussions, from his playing days in the NFL.

Now, he has teamed up with Reebok to help diagnose head trauma.

It's called the Checklight, and is meant to measure the amount of head impact an athlete sustains.

"The whole point is an LED system on this triggers a threshold of impact and the whole point is to remind you to keep your head out of impact. Impacts are going to occur. But to remember to keep in mind each athlete to keep their head out of that impact when it does when you're blocking or tackling, you're checking, whatever sport it may be," Kacyvenski says.

The Checklight works like this:

A red or yellow light blinks and is bright enough for everyone to see, meaning teammates, coaches, referees and trainers can see when a player has suffered a hard hit to the head.

And it takes away the player's responsibility of saying something.

"I know, I've been there. Taking it out of my hands is important. There's that machismo factor in any sport, in any sport that, any contact sport I've played in. It's taking it out of that players hands is important," Kacyvenski says.

Former NFL lineman Max Lane has seen the Checklight in action and thinks it's a great idea.

"It makes sense. Just like in baseball, you have pitch counts and all that. Why don't you have counts on hits to the head. It makes total sense so I think it's a good idea and hopefully it takes off," Lane says.

The Checklight won't diagnose a concussion.

But Kacyvenski feels it'll help teach athletes in all sports to keep their head out of serious impacts.

And make the games safer for everyone.

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